Sunday, 8 January 2017

East of Elveden

I've mentioned this blog before, but there have been some excellent recent additions which explore some aspects of local landscapes, and have given me some inspiration for recent writing and thinking about place.

It describes itself as offering:

Hidden places, secret histories and unsung geography from the east of England and beyond

Follow Laurence Mitchell on Twitter too

Ladybirds and landscapes

Now this is JUST my sort of thing...

Saturday, 7 January 2017

London's Protected Views

This was the title of my KS3 Landscapes Toolkit book on Landscapes. A few copies are still left, and you can buy one from the GA website.

A view is something which can add so much to a person's well being, and also add value to a property: a view of the sea adds tens of thousands to the value of a house for example.
This article describes the potential damaging of a view of London that has been in existence for hundreds of years, and which was thought to be protected: a view of St. Paul's Cathedral.
If one goes to the top of the new Tate Modern extension, one can see a wonderful view across to the Cathedral.

But you can also see the proliferation of tall buildings, some of which are not to everyone's taste.

There are some views of St. Pauls Cathedral, the Monument, Tower of London and other buildings which can't be blocked as they are protected.

The views and directions can be seen on this map, and there's also an interactive version on the link above.
 

I also wrote about this idea for the work that I did as a way of using GIS, but it never really got developed to the same degree as was originally planned.

Here's a statement from St. Paul's cathedral.
The Leadenhall Building's 'cheese grater' shape was apparently so that a classic view to the cathedral was not impinged upon.
This is shown in the London View Management Plan.

Image: Alan Parkinson

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

UK's Geology and Landscape

An article in the Independent on the UK's natural wonders.

"It's geology that has created our diverse and extraordinary natural wonders. We owe the creation of vertiginous cliffs and sea stacks to deposits of sandstone and chalk; soft limestone has been etched and scoured to carve craggy gorges, coastal arches and echoing caverns; and sculpted from extrusions of volcanic basalt are the weirdly geometric columns of causeways and sea caves".

Tuesday, 3 January 2017

New VR article in Independent Education Today journal

A few months ago, I was asked to write an article on the visit that Shailey Minocha and colleague Ana from the Open University, as part of their work with Google Expeditions.
I submitted the article and forgot about it.


It's now available to view online as it's been published in the latest issue of 'Independent Education Today'
They got my job title a little wrong, but otherwise the article was just about as I wrote it.

Sunday, 1 January 2017

Christmas reading...

For those interested in landscapes, this book is recommended...
More to come on this as I get further into it, and start to use it for curriculum making...


Thursday, 22 December 2016

Christmas Blogging Break

I'm about to take my annual break from blogging for a few days...

Thanks for reading Look at Landscapes this year.
Less than 40 new posts this year, but will continue to look for interesting landscape-related stories in the new year.

Image: Ronald Lampitt, who also illustrated 'The Map that came to Life' and many Ladybird books...