Friday, 10 March 2017

Lego-ifier

Mapping tool which turns world maps into Lego... really excellent...
Nice work by John Nelson and Vanni Zhang.

Sunday, 5 March 2017

Robert MacFarlane is now on Twitter

Robert MacFarlane's work and influence has featured here many times. He joined Twitter in February 2017, and already has over 4500 followers.
Follow Robert for landscape words and images and related news.

Saturday, 11 February 2017

Place based research

One of the sessions at the recent GTE Conference that I most wanted to see was Emma Rawlings-Smith's presentation on her research so far into how place is represented in textbooks. I was interviewed by Emma last year as part of this research, with respect to how we wrote the AQA 'A' Level textbook for CUP and the OCR 'A' and 'B' books for Hodder.

Emma has a blog which is used to show her progress in her research.

The blog is called GeoPlaces and is on the Weebly platform.

The blog is connected with her PhD research. It's also very useful to connect the academic ideas on place with the teaching that is involved in the new 'A' level Changing Places topic. Emma interviewed me on my decision-making process when writing and editing the draft of this chapter in the Cambridge University Press textbook.
There is a useful set of resources here.

Finally on Changing Places, you may want to see an article by Richard Phillips in the latest Geography Review magazine, which looks at Changing Places in the context of Hackney. You can follow him on Twitter too.

You could also usefully watch Alan Smith's TED talk below:

Sunday, 8 January 2017

East of Elveden

I've mentioned this blog before, but there have been some excellent recent additions which explore some aspects of local landscapes, and have given me some inspiration for recent writing and thinking about place.

It describes itself as offering:

Hidden places, secret histories and unsung geography from the east of England and beyond

Follow Laurence Mitchell on Twitter too

Ladybirds and landscapes

Now this is JUST my sort of thing...

Saturday, 7 January 2017

London's Protected Views

This was the title of my KS3 Landscapes Toolkit book on Landscapes. A few copies are still left, and you can buy one from the GA website.

A view is something which can add so much to a person's well being, and also add value to a property: a view of the sea adds tens of thousands to the value of a house for example.
This article describes the potential damaging of a view of London that has been in existence for hundreds of years, and which was thought to be protected: a view of St. Paul's Cathedral.
If one goes to the top of the new Tate Modern extension, one can see a wonderful view across to the Cathedral.

But you can also see the proliferation of tall buildings, some of which are not to everyone's taste.

There are some views of St. Pauls Cathedral, the Monument, Tower of London and other buildings which can't be blocked as they are protected.

The views and directions can be seen on this map, and there's also an interactive version on the link above.
 

I also wrote about this idea for the work that I did as a way of using GIS, but it never really got developed to the same degree as was originally planned.

Here's a statement from St. Paul's cathedral.
The Leadenhall Building's 'cheese grater' shape was apparently so that a classic view to the cathedral was not impinged upon.
This is shown in the London View Management Plan.

Image: Alan Parkinson

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

UK's Geology and Landscape

An article in the Independent on the UK's natural wonders.

"It's geology that has created our diverse and extraordinary natural wonders. We owe the creation of vertiginous cliffs and sea stacks to deposits of sandstone and chalk; soft limestone has been etched and scoured to carve craggy gorges, coastal arches and echoing caverns; and sculpted from extrusions of volcanic basalt are the weirdly geometric columns of causeways and sea caves".