Tuesday, 29 May 2012

More oilseed in the news

Another news item on the increasing yellowness of the British countryside, as featured in the toolkit book...

Sunday, 27 May 2012

New Robert MacFarlane Book...

A new Robert MacFarlane book comes out next month...

I enjoyed this Spectator Review

An excellent quote from the book:

Landscape is still often understood as a noun connoting fixity, scenery, an immobile painterly decorum. I prefer to think of the word as a noun containing a hidden verb: landscape scapes, it is dynamic and commotion-causing, it sculpts and shapes us not only over the courses of our lives but also instant by instant, incident by incident. I prefer to take ‘landscape’ as a collective term for the temperature and pressure of the air, the fall of light and its rebounds, the textures and surfaces of rock, soil and building, the sounds (cricket-screech, bird cry, wind through trees), the scents (pine resin, hot stone, crushed thyme) and the uncountable other transitory phenomena and atmospheres that together comprise the bristling presence of a particular place at a particular moment.


This would fit in really nicely when planning how to teach about the landscape using 'Look at it this Way'.

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Music and Landscape...

Just remembered today that Lac Leman in Geneva, pictured below was the Lake referred to in the title of one of my favourite pieces of music: Mike Oldfield's 1984 classic...
Image: Alan Parkinson
I remember this being an important piece of music when I was in my final year of undergraduate studies, when you had to chase down music...
Picture taken a week last Thursday on the shores of the lake in glorious sunshine...
Listen to it now, turn the speakers up loud...



What are your favourite pieces of music that are connected to landscape features ??

Mike has done quite a few, including Mount Teide....

Saturday, 19 May 2012

Mountain landscapes...

Chapter 9 and 10 of the book feature the Southern Alps of New Zealand, and a lesson which involves applying for a job with a company that flies tourists into Milford Sound.
Last weekend I was fortunate enough to be in the European Alps for the first time. After years of showing videos on tourism in Chamonix, I was able to wander through the streets of the town, and then head up on the cable car to L'Aiguille du Midi...
Enjoy some of my images below...
There were quite a few companies offering flights by small plane and helicopter over the Alps, so perhaps you could adapt the lesson to this location instead of using New Zealand, or maybe even a mountain range in the UK....

The hidden landscape

Underlying the British landscape is its GEOLOGY.
This tip is a new feature on the BGS website, which allows the embedding of a UK Geology or Earthquake Map.
Details are HERE if you want to make your own...
Here's a GEOLOGY map - click on it to show the surface geology... How does this relate to the surface landscape ?



Tuesday, 15 May 2012

Dan Raven Ellison: Emerging Explorer...

Exploring landscape is important. Exploring the world is even harder...

I can finally share some news I heard about a few months ago, but which has now been made public...
Daniel Raven Ellison, friend and colleague at the Geography Collective has been named as one of National Geographic's 2012 Emerging Explorers.

The press release is here.
Dan is given the honour alongside other 'visionary young trailblazers' around the world.

The 2012 Emerging Explorers are U.S. cyborg anthropologist Amber Case; U.K. digital storyteller and zoologist Lucy Cooke; U.K. behavioral ecologist Iain Couzin; Mexican underwater archaeologist Guillermo de Anda; chemist Yu-Guo Guo of China; conservationist Osvel Hinojosa Huerta of Mexico; U.S. pilot and educator Barrington Irving; conservation biologist Krithi Karanth of India; Swiss crisis mapper Patrick Meier; U.S. archaeologist Sarah Parcak; U.S. data scientist Jake Porway; U.K. guerrilla geographer Daniel Raven-Ellison; U.S. archaeologist Jeffrey Rose; engineer and renewable energy advocate Ibrahim Togola of Mali; and archaeologist Daniel Torres Etayo of Cuba

Dan's full profile is HERE


Guerrilla geographer Daniel Raven-Ellison brings the spirit of adventure to geographic education, allowing people to see the world — and the field of geography — in new and surprising ways. Guerrilla geography challenges people, especially children, to explore the world around them, engaging in creative play, making new discoveries and forming community connections. Through technologies that allow users to share their experiences digitally, guerrilla geography not only educates but also inspires young people to explore their world in ways that stretch their minds and bodies, and motivates them to educate others and take action in their own communities. His Urban Earth films demonstrate guerrilla geography in action. He has walked across 13 cities, taking photographs every eights steps and editing them to create films to reveal new perspectives on how to experience cities. His program/website, Mission:Explore, and a series of award-winning kids' books of the same name encourage youth to go on adventures to learn about the world. 

This is great news and very well deserved....

Thursday, 3 May 2012

Robert MacFarlane


There's an event in London in June where you can hear Robert MacFarlane talk about his new book 'The Old Ways'. I am due to be in London I think on that day and will try to go along if the timings work.....

How do the landscapes we love shape the people we are? Why do we walk? Join celebrated travel writer Robert Macfarlane for an evening exploring geography, memory, pilgrimage and adventure. For several years and more than a thousand miles, Macfarlane has been following the vast network of old paths and routes that criss-cross Britain and its waters, and connect them to countries and continents beyond. His journeys have taken him from the chalk downs of southern England to the remote bird-islands of the Scottish north-west, from the disputed territories of Palestine to the pilgrimage routes of Spain and the sacred landscapes of the eastern Himalayas. Along the way – along the ways – he has walked stride for stride with a 5,000-year-old man near Liverpool, followed the 'deadliest path in Britain', sailed an open boat far out into the Atlantic along an ancient sea-road, and crossed paths with walkers of many kinds: wanderers, wayfarers, shamans, trespassers, poets, devouts, ghosts and dawdlers. 

Join us for what will be an enthralling account of the ghosts and voices that haunt old tracks, of songlines and their singers, of the stories our tracks keep and tell, and of rights of way and rites of way.





There is also live streaming on the page of the event if you can't make it...